Union United Methodist Church - Brooklyn, N.Y. (photo: Bridge and Tunnel Club)
Union United Methodist Church
(originally New York Avenue Methodist Church)

121 New York Avenue, corner Dean Street
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11216
http://www.gbgm-umc.org/BrooklynUnion/

Organ Specifications:
III/70 Clarence E. Morey, Op. 397 (1929)
III/70 Geo. S. Hutchings Co., Op. 200 (1890)
           
1909 photo of New York Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church - Brooklyn, N.Y. (Brooklyn Collection, Brooklyn Public Library)  
1909 photo (Brooklyn Public Library)
 
Founded in 1846 as the New York Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, the congregation is now known as the Union United Methodist Church. The cornerstone for the present church, Sunday school and parsonage buildings was laid in 1889. J.C. Cady designed the Romanesque complex, which was completed in 1891. The 100-by-103-foot church auditorium, which is in the form of a Greek cross, seats 1,100 and is covered by a square dome supported on four massive columns. The 100-foot tower is in the center of the New York Avenue facade.
         
  Console of C.E. Corey organ, Op. 397 (1929) in New York Avenue Methodist Church (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
  C.E. Morey console (1929)
  Robert S. Rowland with Setterboard of C.E. Morey organ, Op. 397 (1929) in New York Avenue Methodist Church - Brooklyn, NY (1969 Organ Historical Soc. Convention)
  Robert S. Rowland next to the C.E. Morey setterboard he helped build
Clarence E. Morey
Utica, N.Y. – Opus 397 (1929)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals




The organ in Union Methodist Church was originally built in 1890 by the George S. Hutchings Co. of Boston. In 1929, Clarence E. Morey of Utica, N.Y., rebuilt the organ (as his opus 397) with electro-pneumatic action. Morey also provided a new three-manual console with color-coded stopkeys: flue stops were white; reeds were brown; tremulants were red; and couplers were black. At this time, Morey combined the divided Swell 16' Bourdon into one stop tablet. The combination action is controlled by a setterboard concealed in the case directly behind the organist's back. At the right is a photo (from the 1969 Organ Historical Society Convention in New York City) showing Robert S. Rowland, an employee of Morey, who helped build the setterboard.

The rebuilt organ was dedicated by T. Tertius Noble, organist of St. Thomas Church, Manhattan, on January 23, 1930.
         
  Geo. S. Hutchings fašade with console of C.E. Corey organ, Op. 397 (1929) in New York Avenue Methodist Church (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
  Geo. S. Hutchings façade and C.E. Morey console (1929)
George S. Hutchings Company
Boston, Mass. – Opus 200 (1890)
Tubular-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 60 stops, 70 ranks, 3,917 pipes









For the present building, the church selected George S. Hutchings of Boston to build a new organ. Following is an account of the organ from the Brooklyn Eagle (Nov. 14, 1890):


THE BIG ORGAN.
Dedication of the New York
Avenue Instrument.

A Huge and Powerful Producer of Melody
Put Into Practical Use for the First
Time—Facts About Its Construction.
The spacious and beautiful church recently completed on New York avenue and Dean street contained a large audience last evening, and the circles of light overhead brought out admirably the sweeping lines of construction, the four huge arches resting on heavy columns, the warm tinted walls, the square dome pierced with windows, the pulpit stage bushy with palms, the exquisite triple window at the back and a stack of golden pipes filling the large alcove at the left of the platform. These pipes were only the front ranks in a forest of tubes, 3,917 of them altogether, that compose the new organ of the church, and the audience had assembled to hear it speak. A programme of thirteen numbers, three of them vocal, was presented, and it met with manifest approval, although the public was laid under an injunction not to applaud anything. The opening piece, Rheinberger's pastoral sonata, was played by Carl G. Schmidt, organist of the church. Though a work of little artistic value, he made it a sufficing medium for exhibiting the power of the instrument, and Samuel P. Warren who presided at the keyboard for the rest of the evening, seemed also to delight in strength of tone. The best organs roar and screech a good deal when all the stops are out and they are heard to best advantage only in soft and mezzo forte passages that allow the disclosure of orchestral coloring. The new instrument has a diapason of great volume; the grand organ is heavy and large in tone; the swell and choir varied and expressive; the mechanism prompt and pliant.
     Externally the organ is not so much to look at as many of less power, for most of it is concealed in the alcove. It is regarded by musicians, however, as an exceptionally perfect instrument, the power and range of its stops so largely making up for their comparative lack in number that it is said to be nearly equal to the one in Sydney, N.S.W., a bellowing monster of 126 stops—more than twice as many as this one has. The choir organ as well as the swell is inclosed [sic] in a box, and the pedal range, including a crescendo effect that can be employed automatically, is unusually ample, a 32 foot pipe giving its gravest note. The stops act with unusual celerity, as their motion is assisted by compressed air, and combinations are quickly made with the push of a piston knob. Four bellows, pumped by a gas engine, furnish wind and plenty of it, for the loudest fortissimo did not produce any wavering or failing in the tone.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason
61
4
  Gambetto
61
8
  Open Diapason (large)
61
2 2/3
  Octave Quint
61
8
  Open Diapason (medium)
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Viola di Gamba
61
    Mixture V ranks
305
8
  Viola d'Amour
61
    Scharff III ranks
183
8
  Clarabella
61
16
  Double Trumpet
61
8
  Doppel Flote
61
8
  Trumpet
61
4
  Flute Harmonique
61
4
  Clarion
61
4
  Octave
61
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon Bass
12
4
  Octave
61
16
  Bourdon Treble
49
4
  Fugara
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Flauto Traverso
61
8
  Gemshorn
61
2
  Flautino
61
8
  Hohl Flote
61
    Dolce Cornet V
305
8
  Salicional
61
16
  Contra Fagotto
61
8
  Vox Celestis [TC]
49
8
  Cornopean
61
8
  Aeoline
61
8
  Oboe
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
8
  Vox Humana
61
8
  Quintadena
61
4
  Saxophone
61
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Lieblich Gedackt
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Violina
61
8
  Geigen Principal
61
4
  Flute d'Amour
61
8
  Spitz Flote
61
2
  Piccolo Harmonique
61
8
  Concert Flute
61
8
  Orchestral Oboe
61
8
  Dolcissimo
61
8
  Clarinet
61
8
  Gedackt
61
       
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
32
  Contra Bourdon
30
8
  Octave
30
16
  Open Diapason
30
8
  Violoncello
30
16
  Violone
30
8
  Flute
30
16
  Dulciana
30
16
  Trombone
30
16
  Bourdon
30
8
  Tromba
30
10 2/3
  Quint
30
       
               
Couplers
    Swell to Great       Great to Pedal  
    Choir to Great       Swell to Pedal  
    Swell to Choir       Choir to Pedal  
    Great to Pneumatics          
               
Mechanical Accessories
    Swell Tremolo       Wind Indicator  
    Choir Tremolo          
               
Pedal Movements
    Adjustable Combination Pedals, affecting Great and Pedal
    Adjustable Combination Pedals, affecting Swell and Pedal
    Adjustable Combination Pedals, affecting Choir and Pedal
    Adjustable Combination Pedals, affecting Pedal
    Full Organ    
    All Couplers    
    Swell to Great, and Swell on itself    
    Choir to Great Sub Octaves    
    Reversible Great to Pedal      
    Balanced Swell Pedal        
    Balanced Choir Pedal        
    Grand Crescendo, Affecting Full Organ      
           
Sources:
     "Events Tonight," Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Jan. 23, 1930). Recital by T. Tertius Noble.
     Stern, Robert A.M., Thomas Mellins, and David Fishman. New York 1880: Architecture and Urbanism in the Gilded Age. New York: The Monacelli Press, Inc., 1999.
     "The Big Organ. Dedication of the New York Avenue Instrument,"Brooklyn Eagle (Nov. 14, 1890).
     Union United Methodist Church web site: http://www.gbgm-umc.org/BrooklynUnion/

Illustrations:
     Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn Collection. 1909 photo of exterior.
     Trupiano, Larry. Console of Clarence E. Morey organ, Op. 397 (1929); Robert S. Rowland with the Morey organ setterboard (from the 1969 OHS Convention).
     Union United Methodist Church web site. Exterior.