Crawford Memorial United Methodist Church - Bronx, N.Y.
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Crawford Memorial United Methodist Church

3751 White Plains Road at East 218th Street
Bronx, N.Y. 10467


Organ Specifications:
Present building (since 1929)
III/37 A.B. Felgemaker, Op. 700 (1899); rebuilt 1930
Second building (1894-burned 1926)
II/22 George Jardine & Son (1896) – burned 1926
First building (1864-1893)
• unknown


The Crawford Memorial United Methodist Church dates back to 1852 when a Methodist society was organized in the village of Olinville, an area on the east bank of the Bronx River. At that time, the society consisted of opulent landowners, developers, businessmen, legislators, judges, architects, bankers, and insurance brokers. An early church was built in 1864 and served the congregation for the next thirty years. In later years, the Olinville neighborhood became part of the larger area known as Williamsbridge.

Williamsbridge Methodist Episcopal Church (Kramer, 1906)  
Williamsbridge M.E. Church (1896)  
In 1893 plans were made for the erection of a large and handsome new edifice for the society then known as Williamsbridge Methodist Episcopal Church. Designed by Weary & Kramer, architects of Akron, Ohio, and New York, the Romanesque edifice was built on the "Akron" plan which allowed the 650-seat auditorium of the church and the Sunday-school hall to be united into one large auditorium seating a total of 1300 people. The interior was modestly decorated with a plaster ceiling painted in neutral tints. The basement was finished to include a lecture room and rooms for the social gatherings of the church. Estimated cost of the new building was $50,000. In October 1926 the church was destroyed by fire, but was completely rebuilt in 1928 and dedicated on January 27, 1929 by Bishop Ernest Gladstone Richardson of the Philadelphia area. At some point, the church took the name of Crawford Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church.

As the demographics of the Bronx changed, the congregation has evolved to include its new residents, most of whom are new immigrants from various countries and the Caribbean Islands. 
           
A. B. Felgemaker
Buffalo, N.Y. – Opus 700 (1899)
Originally mechanical action; electrified by Clark & Fenton (1930)
3 manuals, 36 stops, 37 ranks


This three-manual-and-pedal organ was originally built by A.B. Felgemaker in 1899 and installed in the Fourteenth Street Presbyterian Church in Manhattan. In 1930, the organ was moved to Crawford Memorial Methodist in the Bronx, where it was rebuilt and electrified by Clark & Fenton. The status of this organ as of 2009 is unknown.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
2 2/3
  Octave Quinte
61
8
  Viola da Gamba
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Doppel Floete
61
    Mixture 3 ranks
183
4
  Flute d'Amour
61
8
  Trumpet
61
               
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon (2 draws)
61
4
  Flute Harmonique
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Violina
61
8
  Salicional
61
2
  Flautino
61
8
  Vox Celeste
61
    Dolce Cornet 3 ranks
183
8
  Aeolina
61
8
  Oboe and Bassoon
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
8
  Vox Humana [in box]
61
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
8
  Geigen Principal
61
4
  Concert Flute
61
8
  Melodia
61
2
  Harmonic Piccolo *
61
8
  Dulciana
61
8
  Clarinet
61
8
  Quintidon [sic]
61
    * changed to Unda Maris  
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Open Diapason
30
16
  Bourdon
30
16
  Violone
30
8
  Violoncello
30
               
Couplers and Mechanical Accessories
    Great to Pedal       Swell to Great super octaves  
    Swell to Pedal       Swell to Great sub-octaves  
    Choir to Pedal       Choir to Great sub-octaves  
    Swell to Great       Tremolo  
    Choir to Great       Bellows Signal  
    Swell to Choir       Wind Indicator  
               
Pedal Movements
    Forte Great with appropriate Pedal stops
    Mezzo Great with appropriate Pedal stops
    Piano Great with appropriate Pedal stops
    Forte Swell with appropriate Pedal stops
    Mezzo Swell with appropriate Pedal stops
    Piano Swell with appropriate Pedal stops
    Balanced Swell Pedal
    Great to Pedal Reversible Coupler
    Balanced Crescendo & Full Organ Pedal
    Electric motor
               
    Extended console          
           
George Jardine & Son
New York City (1896)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 20 stops, 22 ranks


The first organ in the present building (then known as the Olin or Williamsbridge Methodist Episcopal Church) was built in 1896 by George Jardine & Son of New York City. The following specifications were recorded (Aug. 30, 1916) by an employee of Louis F. Mohr & Co., an organ service concern in the area. Mohr noted that the organ had electric action and burned in October 1926.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Flute Harmonic
61
8
  Doppel Flute
61
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
8
  Clarabella
61
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Gamba
61
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Violin[o]
61
8
  Clariana
61
2
  Flageolet
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
    Cornet 3 ranks
183
8
  Violin
61
8
  Trumpet [TC]
48
8
  Aeoline
61
8
  Tromba [bass]
12
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Open Diapason
30
       
16
  Bourdon
30
       
               
Couplers and Mechanical Accessories
    Great to Pedal       Tremolo  
    Swell to Pedal          
    Swell to Great       Orgoblo  
    Pedal to Pedal Octave          
           
Sources:
     A. B. Felgemaker Opus List, compiled by Sand Lawn. Courtesy David Scribner.
     "Bishop Dedicates Church," The New York Times, January 28, 1929.
     "Bronx Church Burns Mortgage," The New York Times, January 18, 1947.
     "Bronx Church Faces Sale," The New York Times, April 12, 1935.
     "For Williamsbridge Methodists," The New York Times, September 25, 1893.
     Jardine Opus List, compiled by Sand Lawn. Courtesy David Scribner.
     Jenkins, Stephen. The Story of the Bronx from the Purchase Made by the Dutch from the Indians in 1639 to the Present Day. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1912
     Kidder, Frank Eugene. Churches and Chapels. New York: William T. Comstock, 1906.
     Kramer, George W. The What How and Why of Church Building. New York: Geo. W. Kramer, 1897.
     Mohr, Louis F. & Co. Specifications (Aug. 30, 1916) of George Jardine & Son organ. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     Tellers, Aaron (Tellers Organ Co., Erie, Penn.). Specifications of A. B. Felgemaker organ, Op. 700 (1899).

Photos:
     Kramer, George W. The What How and Why of Church Building. New York: Geo. W. Kramer, 1897. Exterior.
           
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