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St. Peter's Church
(Episcopal)
Westchester Square
2500 Westchester Avenue
The Bronx, N.Y. 10461
http://stpetersb.dioceseny.org


Organ Specifications:
III/42 Sebastian Glück (1996) – reb.
• III/39 Herbert Brown (1952) – reb.
• III/28 Austin Organs Inc., Op. 2096 (1947)
• III/39s E. & G.G. Hook & Hastings, Op. 1876 (1900)
• II/23 George Jardine & Son (1893)
• II/17 Hilborne L. Roosevelt, Op. 47 (1880)
• Hall & Labagh (1855)


St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square - Bronx, N.Y. (Photo: Ken Potter)

St. Peter's Episcopal Church was founded in 1693 in the Village of Westchester. The Gothic Revival stone edifice is the third building to occupy the site. It was built between 1853-55 by Leopold Eidlitz, a Czech architect known for the old Temple Emanu-el and St. George's Episcopal Church in Manhattan. In 1877, a fire destroyed part of the church, after which it was rebuilt and somewhat altered by Leopold's son Cyrus in 1879. The nave peaks at seventy-five feet above the floor and includes transepts. A working ten-bell chime, cast in 1923 by the Meneely Bell Company of Troy, N.Y., is in the copper-spired stone tower. The nearby Sunday school and chapel building (now called Foster Hall) exemplify High Victorian Gothic design, and the cemetery contains many gravestones from the 18th century.

St. Peter's Church, Complex and Cemetery were designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1976, and listed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1983.
           
 

Austin Organ, Op. 2096 (1947) - St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square - Bronx, N.Y. (Photo: Ken Potter)

  Austin Organ, Op. 2096 (1947) - St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square - Bronx, N.Y. (Photo: Ken Potter)
Sebastian Glück
New York City (1981)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 33 stops, 42 ranks




In 1981, a program of re-actioning and tonal revision was begun by Sebastian Gluck, with generous console preparations for expansion should funds become available in the future.
               
Grand-Orgue (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Principal Bass
61
 
  Eclat VIII ranks *
8
  Montre
61
16
  Bombarde *
8
  Flûte Allemande
61
8
  Prémière Trompette *
8
  Flûte Harmonique *
8
  Deuxième Trompette
8
  Cor de Chamois
61
8
  Trompette de Fête *
4
  Prestant
61
5 1/3
  Basson Quinte *
4
  Flûte Octaviante *
4
  Clairon *
2
  Doublette
61
 
   

  Grand Cornet V ranks*
 
 
Clochettes [Mayland]  

  Plein Jeu IV ranks
244
 
 
Zimbelstern
4 bells

     

     
Récit expressif (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
73
 
  Fourniture III ranks
183
8
  Principal
73
 
  Cornet V ranks *
8
  Flûte Bouchée
73
16
  Clarinette Basse *
8
  Voix Mystiques II ranks
134
8
  Trompette Harmonique
73
8
  Gambe
73
8
  Basson-Hautbois
73
8
  Voix Céleste
73
8
  Voix Humaine [sep. box]
73
4
  Prestant
73
8
  Trompette de Fête *
4
  Bourdon Perce
73
 
  Tremblant
2
  Cor de Nuit
61
 
   

     

     
Positiv expressif (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Bourdon *
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  Grand Principal
61
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
8
  Flûte à Cheminée
61
 
  Couronne IV ranks
244
8
  Viole Sourdine
61
8
  Cromorne
61
4
  Prestant
61
8
  Cor Anglais *
4
  Flûte à Bec
61
8
  Trompette de Fête *
2 2/3
  Nasard
61

  Tremblant
2
  Quarte Harmonique
61

   

     

   
Pédale Orgue – 32 notes
32
  Principal Basse [resultant]
2
  Flûte *
16
  Montre
44
 
  Mixture III ranks *
16
  Contrebasse
GO
32
  Contre Bombarde *
16
  Soubasse
56
16
  Ophicleide (ext. G.O.)
12
16
  Contre Dulciane
GO
16
  Clarinette *
16
  Bourdon
.RÉC
8
  Prèmiére Trompette *
8
  Octave Basse (fr. Montre)
8
  Deuxième Trompette
GO
8
  Flûte Couverte (fr. Soub)
4
  Clairon *
8
  Violoncelle
GO
4
  Cor de Chasse *
4
  Quinzième (fr. Soub)
 
     

     

 
* console preparation
           
Herbert Brown
New York City (1952)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 39 ranks


In 1952, Herbert Brown, an organbuilder in New York who had worked for Austin Organs, revised the Austin Organ, Op. 2096 (1947) with the addition of an 11-rank Choir division that consisted of vintage ranks from various sources. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
           
Austin Organs Inc.
Hartford, Conn. – Opus 2096 (1947)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 28 ranks


Austin's Opus 2096 was one of the first organs to be built by that company after World War II, and incorporated most of the flue pipework from the Hook and Hastings organ. It was a two-manual-and-pedal instrument of 28 ranks, but was prepared for the addition of a Choir division. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
E. & G.G. Hook & Hastings
Boston, Mass. – Opus 1876 (1900)
Mechanical action
3 manuals, 39 registers


In 1900, the organ was moved from the chancel to the gallery by E. & G.G. Hook & Hastings. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
George Jardine & Son
New York City (1893)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 23 ranks


In 1893, the Jardine company rebuilt the 1880 Roosevelt organ. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Hilborne L. Roosevelt
New York City – Opus 47 (1880)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 17 stops, 22 registers


The original organ in the present building stood in an alcove to the right of the chancel in what is now the Lady Chapel. The Roosevelt instrument contained the blue stencilled pipes that stand in the façade of the present organ. Unfortunately, the church's archives do not contain a stoplist of this organ.
           
Hall & Labagh
New York City (1855)
Mechanical action


Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Sources:
     Dolkart, Andrew S. and Matthew A. Postal. Guide to New York City Landmarks (Third Edition). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2004.
     The Guild of Carillonneurs in North America website: www.gcna.org
     Van Pelt, William T., compiler. The Hook Opus List, 1829-1916 in Facsimile. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1991.

Illustrations:
     Potter, Kenneth. Exerior; interior; Austin organ, Op. 2096 (1947); rev. Gluck.