St. Peter Lutheran Church - Bronx, NY (photo: Dave Schmauch)
  Click on images to enlarge
St. Peter in the Bronx Lutheran Church
(Evangelical Lutheran Church in America)

435 East 140th Street near Willis Avenue
Bronx, N.Y. 10454


Organ Specifications:
431 East 140th Street near Willis Avenue
(since 1911)
• II/ Hammond Musical Instrument Co. Model C-3
III/20 W.W. Kimball Co. (1929)
East 141st Street near Willis Avenue (1892-1911)
• unknown


St. Peter's German Evangelical Lutheran Church was organized in 1890, with first services held on East 142nd Street and Alexander Avenue. In 1892, the society moved to East 141st Street near Willis Avenue.

The present church, located midblock on East 140th Street between Willis and Brook Avenues, was built in 1911. To the west of the church is the two-story parsonage, built in 1912. Louis Allmendinger designed both structures in a neo-Gothic style, using gray brick trimmed with terra cotta and limestone. The church and parsonage are at the end of a row of eleven unusual brownstones designed by Walter Hornum and built by developer William O'Gorman. The block is within the Mott Haven East Historic District, designated in 1994 by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Over the years, the congregation dropped its German-language services in favor of English. As the German and Irish residents moved out of the Mott Haven neighborhoods, the brownstones and tenements became home to many black and hispanic families. Today the congregation is known as St. Peter in the Bronx Lutheran Church, and is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.
         
  St. Peter Lutheran Church - Bronx, NY (photo: Dave Schmauch)
  Interior showing two organ grills above altar
W.W. Kimball Co.
Chicago, Ill. (1929)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 21 registers, 18 stops, 20 ranks


In 1929, a new organ was built by W.W. Kimball of Chicago. Kimball installed the organ in two chambers above the chancel. The three-manual console was located in front of the pews on the right side. At some point, the console was removed, rendering the organ unplayable, but the chests (and possibly the pipes) are extant in the chambers.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, possibly enclosed with Choir
8
  Diapason
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Concert Flute
61
   
Chimes
preparation
8
  Gemshorn
61
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
73
4
  Flauto d'Amore
73
8
  Gedeckt
73
    Mixture III ranks
183
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Cornopean
73
8
  Voix Celeste (TC)
61
8
  Vox Humana
61
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Melodia
73
8
  Clarinet
73
8
  Dulciana
73
8
 
Harp (TC)
4
  Flute a Cheminee
61
4
 
Celesta
49 bars
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Resultant
8
  Flute (fr. Diaphone)
16
  Diaphone
44
8
  Flute (fr. Bourdon)
16
  Bourdon
44
       
           
Sources:
     The American Organist (July 1929). Stoplist of W.W. Kimball Organ (1929). Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     The Diapason (June 1929). Stoplist of W.W. Kimball Organ (1929). Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     Dolkart, Andrew S. and Matthew A. Postal. Guide to New York City Landmarks (Third Edition). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2004.
     Gray, Christopher. "Whimsy Elevates the Ordinary," The New York Times (Feb. 26, 2006).
     Haberstroh, Richard. The German Churches of Metropolitan New York: A Research Guide. New York: The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society, 2000.
     Mott Haven East Historic District," New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. April 5, 1994.
     Nelson, George. Organs of the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     Trupiano, Larry. Electronic correspondence (Jul 11, 2011) regarding W.W. Kimball organ.

Illustrations:
     Schmauch, Dave. Exterior; interior (2011).