Congregation Rodeph Sholom - New York City (photo: Wurts Bros., 1930)
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Congregation Rodeph Sholom
(Reform Jewish)

7 West 83rd Street
New York, NY 10024
http://www.rodephsholom.org


Organ Specifications:
7 West 83rd Street (since 1930)
• II/39 Rodgers Instruments LLC electronic (1979)
III/48 Casavant Frères, Op. 1334 (1929)
Lexington Avenue and 63rd Street (1891-1930)
II/32 George Jardine & Son (c.1875)
8 Clinton Street (1853-1891)
• unknown



Founded by German immigrants in 1842, Congregation Rodeph Sholom (Pursuers of Peace) is one of the oldest Reform congregations in New York City. Its first synagogue, located at 8 Clinton Street and built in 1853, is still in use by Congregation Chasam Sopher, making it the second-oldest synagogue in the city.

Rodeph Sholom Synagogue (1926) - New York City (Library of Congress)  
Lexington Avenue (1926)  
   
In 1891, Rodeph Sholom followed the northward migration of its members, purchasing the former Temple Beth-El, located on the corner of Lexington Avenue and 63rd Street, after that congregation moved to a new building on Fifth Avenue. Designed by D. & J. Jardine, the Victorian Romanesque sanctuary was built in 1872-73.

  Congregation Rodeph Sholom - New York City (Sepp Leaf Co.)
  Sanctuary Interior
By the late 1920s, many of the members had moved to spacious new apartments across the park on the Upper West Side. At the same time, Congregation Emanu-El announced plans to build an enormous temple and community house on Fifth Avenue and 65th Street.

Congregation Rodeph Shalom decided to relocate near its members and purchased property on West 83rd Street, between Columbus Avenue and Central Park West.

In 1930, Rodeph Sholom moved to its present location on the Upper West Side. The Romanesque Temple House and Sanctuary, designed by Charles B. Meyers, were built in 1929-30 and dedicated on Purim in March 1930.
           
Rodgers Instruments LLC
Hillsboro, Ore. (1979)
Electronic tone generation
Solid-state key, stop and combination action
2 manuals, 39 stops


In 1979 an electronic organ by Rodgers Instruments was installed in the Sanctuary.
           
Casavant Frères, Limitée
St. Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada – Opus 1334 (1929)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 47 registers, 41 stops, 48 ranks



The original organ in the present sanctuary was built in 1929 by Casavant Frères of Canada. In 1967, the Pendarvis Organ Co. did some work on the organ which included a new 3-manual Austin console. The organ suffered water damage due a leaky roof, and after a full evaluation by the Board of Trustees, it was decided to replace the pipe organ with an electronic organ. At some point, the organ was sold to the Berkshire Organ Co., and removed to storage. The Southfield Organ Co. later took possession of the organ, and in 1992, Southfield installed the organ in the First Baptist Church of Avondale Estates, Georgia, a suburb east of Atlanta.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason
73
4
  Harmonic Flute
73
8
  1st Open Diapason
73
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  2nd Open Diapason
73
    Mixture V ranks
365
8
  Hohl Flöte
73
8
  Trumpet
73
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
    Harp
CH
8
  Gemshorn
73
    Celesta
CH
4
  Octave
73
       
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
73
  Cornet IV ranks
292
8
  Open Diapason
73
16
  Double Trumpet *
73
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
8
  Cornopean *
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Voix Céleste
73
8
  Vox Humana [sep. box]
73
8
  Spitz Flöte
73
4
  Clarion *
73
8
  Flute Céleste
73
  Tremulant  
4
  Principal
73
8
  Harp
CH
4
  Flauto Traverso
73
4
  Celesta
CH
2
  Flautino
61
     
 
     
 
     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Contra Gamba
73
2
  Harmonic Piccolo
61
8
  Open Diapason
73
8
  French Horn *
73
8
  Concert Flute
73
8
  Clarinet
73
8
  Dulciana
73
  Tremulant  
8
  Unda Maris
73
8
 
Harp
61 bars
4
  Flûte d'Amour
73
4
 
Celesta
2 2/3
  Nazard
73
     
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Double Diapason (resultant)
8
  Flute (fr. Op. Diap.)
16
  Open Diapason
44
8
  Violoncello
32
16
  Bourdon
44
8
  Stopped Diapason (fr. Bdn)
16
  Gedeckt
SW
16
  Trombone *
44
16
  Violone
CH
8
  Trumpet * (fr. Tbn)
               
           
* stops on heavier wind
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8'   Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Great Sub, Super
    Choir to Pedal 8'   Swell Sub, Super
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Choir Sub, Super
    Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'    
               
Adjustable Combination Pistons
   
Great Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Swell Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Choir Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Pedal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Entire Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (foot)
               
Reversible Pistons
    Great to Pedal (foot)   Full Organ (foot)
    Swell to Pedal   All Reeds On *
    Choir to Pedal   All Reeds Off *
    Swell to Great  
* effects also the Crescendo or Full Organ.
    Choir to Great    
    Swell to Choir      
               
Balanced Pedals
    Swell Pedal to Swell      
    Swell Pedal to Choir      
    Crescendo on all stops and couplers      
               
Mechanicals
    Crescendo Indicator       Full Organ Indicator  
    Wind Indicator       Voltmeter  
           
  George Jardine & Son Organ (c.1875) in Temple Rodeph Sholom - New York City (Rodeph Sholom Archives)
Organ in synagogue on Lexington Avenue at 63rd Street:

George Jardine & Son
New York City (c.1875)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 27 stops, 32 ranks






The New York City organbuilding firm of Jardine & Son installed a two-manual mechanical action organ in Temple Anshe Chesed, located on Lexington Avenue at 63rd Street. The date of this organ has not been confirmed but is assumed to be contemporary with the opening of the building in 1875.

Lynnwood Farnam (1885-1930), noted concert organist of the early 20th century, recorded the following specifications on Nov. 11, 1922 in one of his "Organ Notebooks" now in the collection of the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Farnam inspected the organ in what was then Temple Rodeph Sholom, and wrote these comments:
"A noble old instrument, honest and fine. Nearly all pipes are on view and variously painted. The Gt. 16 ft. is artistically voiced and tonally forms a rich background, blending well with any 8 ft. stop even in tenor octave. Placed in west gallery. Tracker action. Organist – Joseph Davis."
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 58 notes
16
  Double Diapason
58
4
  Flute Harmonique
58
8
  Open Diapason
58
2 2/3
  Twelfth
58
8
  Gamba
58
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  Melodia
58
    Mixture III ranks
174
8
  Clariana Flute
58
8
  Trumpet
58
4
  Principal
58
4
  Clarion
58
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 58 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon Bass
12
4
  Echo Flute
58
16
  Bourdon Treble
46
2
  Piccolo
58
8
  Open Diapason
58
    Cornet IV ranks
232
8
  Lieblich Gedeckt
58
8
  Cornopean
58
8
  Dulciana
58
8
  Vox Humana
58
4
  Principal
58
    Tremolo  
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 27 notes
16
  Open Diapason (wood)
27
8
  Violoncello
27
16
  Violon (metal)
27
4
  Super Octave
27
16
  Bourdon
27
       
               
Couplers
  Hand-pistons
    Great to Pedal       6 to Great (tracker action)  
    Swell to Pedal       1 Great to Pedal on  
    Bellows Signal       1 Great to Pedal off  
    Swell to Great (by On & Off piston)  
           
Sources:
     Casavant Frères, Limitée. Factory Specification, Opus 1334, May 31, 1928. Courtesy Stanley Scheer.
     Congregation Rodeph Sholom web site: www.rodephsholom.org
     Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
     Farnam, Lynnwood. "Organ Notebook," p.1530 (specification of George Jardine & Son organ). John de Lancie Library, The Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia. Sally Branca, Archivist. Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.

Illustrations:
     Congregation Rodeph Sholom Archives. George Jardine & Son Organ (c.1875). Courtesy Josh Abramowitz.
     Wurts Bros. (New York). Exterior (1930). Museum of the City of New York Collection.
           
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