Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church - Stapleton, Staten Island, New York
  Click on images to enlarge
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church

309 St. Paul's Avenue
Staten Island, N.Y. 10304
http://trinitylutheransiny.org

Organ Specifications:
309 St. Paul's Avenue (since 1914):
Present building (since 1914):
III/38 Casavant Frères, Op. 2167 (1953)
• II/ Reuben Midmer & Sons (1906)
First building (1865-1913):
• II/ Reuben Midmer & Sons (1906)
• Unknown Builder
Cebra Avenue (1856-1865):
• unknown



Original building (1866-1913) of Trinity Lutheran Church - Stapleton, Staten Island, New York  
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, originally named Deutsche Evangelische Lutheranische Kirche (German Evangelical Lutheran Church), was founded in October of 1856 by a group of German immigrants that felt a church was needed in the Stapleton area of Staten Island. For the first eight years the congregation met in the Kingsley Methodist Episcopal Church, located on Cebra Avenue. In February of 1865, the congregation acquired four building lots at the corner of Beach Street and what is now St. Paul’s Avenue. In November 1865, the congregation purchased a wood Carpenter Gothic building from the Unitarian Church, located at Victory Boulevard and Cebra Avenue, and moved it to their lots on St. Paul’s Avenue and Beach Street. In May 1866, the congregation held its first service in the new building and continued to use it until 1913. In 1873, the congregation merged with St. John’s Lutheran Church, located on Broad Street in Stapleton, and joint congregation met at the church on St. Paul’s Avenue and Beach Street.

Trinity Lutheran Church - Stapleton, Staten Island, New York  
In 1907, Trinity called as its pastor the Rev. Dr. Frederic Sutter. Shortly after the arrival of Pastor Sutter, the church felt a need for a new church building. By 1913, work had begun on a new neo-Gothic church and parish house that were designed by the architectural firm of Upjohn & Conable. Hobart B. Upjohn was the son of Richard M. Upjohn and grandson of Richard Upjohn. In 1908, he established a partnership with George W. Conable, and worked together for about six years. Constructed of grey brick with cast stone and limestone trim, the cruciform planned church is distinguished by its recessed central entry porch with curving sidewalls and a groined and ribbed ceiling, large stained-glass windows with Gothic tracery, and massive corner tower ornamented with gargoyles and finials. The words Deutsche Evangelische Lutheran Kirche are inscribed on the cornerstone at the base of the tower. The stained glass windows were produced by the Mayer studio in Munich. The picturesquely designed, L-shaped parish hall was constructed with the same materials as the church. Its design is suggestive of late Gothic chapter houses and collegiate buildings, distinguishing it from the church and giving the architects more flexibility to incorporate modern elements. The new church building was opened in 1914.

The church was renamed Trinity Lutheran Church in 1928 to distinguish it from other German Lutheran churches on Staten Island.

Trinity Lutheran Church is within the St. Paul's Avenue – Stapleton Heights Historic District, designated on June 29, 2004 by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.
           
  Casavant Organ, Op. 2167 (1953) in Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church - Stapleton, Staten Island, New York
Casavant Frères, Limitée
St. Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada – Opus 2167 (1953)
Electro-pneumatic action
Solid-state combination action
3 manuals, 42 registers, 33 stops, 38 ranks
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes (3½" pressure)
8
  Open Diapason
68
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Hohlflöte
68
    Mixture III ranks
183
8
  Gemshorn
68
    Chimes
CH
4
  Octave
68
       
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed (4½" pressure)
16
  Lieblich Bourdon
68
    Mixture IV ranks
244
8
  Geigen Diapason
68
16
  Contra Oboe
68
8
  Stopped Diapason
68
8
  Trompette *
68
8
  Gamba
68
4
  Clarion
68
8
  Voix Celeste
68
    Tremulant  
4
  Geigen Octave
68
   
* New rank added by Schantz c.1980;
replacing original Trumpet.
4
  Flute Triangulaire
68
   
 
     
 
     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed (4½" pressure)
8
  Melodia
68
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Spitz Flute
68
8
  Clarinet
68
8
  Spitz Flute Celeste
68
    Tremulant  
4
  Lieblich Flute
68
   
Chimes *
25 tubes
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
   
* from previous organ
               
Positive Organ (floating) – 61 notes (3½" pressure)
8
  Bourdon
61
2
  Flautino
61
4
  Principal
61
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
4
  Flute Harmonique
61
1
  Blockflöte
61
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes (4", 4½", and 5" pressure)
16
  Contra Bass (metal)
56
4
  Choral Bass (fr. C.Bass)
16
  Bourdon
44
32
  Contra Fagotto (ext. SW)
digital
16
  Gedeckt
SW
16
  Trombone
56
8
  Cello (fr. C.Bass)
16
  Fagotto
SW
8
  Bourdon (fr. 16')
8
  Trumpet (fr. Trombone)
8
  Gedeckt
SW
4
  Clarion (fr. Trombone)
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Positive to Swell 8'
    Positive to Pedal 8'   Positive to Choir 8'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'   Great Super
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Swell Sub, Super
    Positive to Great 8   Choir Sub, Super
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'    
               
Adjustable Combination Pistons
   
Swell Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Great Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Choir Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Positive Organ Pistons 1-2-3 (thumb)
Pedal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4 (foot)
Entire Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb & foot)
  General Release (thumb)
  Adjuster (thumb)
               
Reversibles
    Great to Pedal (thumb & foot)   Choir to Great
    Swell to Pedal   Positive to Great
    Choir to Pedal   Swell to Choir
    Positive to Pedal   Full Organ (foot)
    Swell to Great    
               
Balanced Pedals
    Expression Pedal to Swell  
    Expression Pedal to Choir  
    Crescendo on all stops and couplers  
           
Reuben Midmer & Sons
Brooklyn, N.Y. (1906)
Mechanical action
2 manuals


Reuben Midmer & Sons of Brooklyn built a new organ in 1906 for a consideration of $2,381.60, with a credit of $153.09 for the old organ. It seems likely that the Midmer organ was moved to the present church building when it opened in 1914.
           
Sources:
     The Diapason (Sept. 1952). Stoplist of Casavant Frères organ, Op. 2167. Courtesy Jeff Scofield.
     Midmer Ledger Book entries for 1906 organ. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     "St. Paul's Avenue – Stapleton Heights Historic District Designation Report," New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, June 29, 2004.
     Scheer, Stanley. Factory Specification of Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 2167, May 8, 1952.
     Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church website: http://trinitylutheransiny.org

Illustrations:
     "St. Paul's Avenue – Stapleton Heights Historic District Designation Report". Exterior.
     Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church website. Photo of original church; drawing of present church; photo of Casavant Organ, Op. 2167 (1953).