Manhattan — Church of St. Stephen of Hungary — Upper East Side

Categories: Houses of Worship, Religious and Houses of Worship, Roman Catholic

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venue_name => Church of St. Stephen of Hungary
venue_filename => StStephenHungary.html
borough => manhattan
neighborhood => Upper East Side
vp_title => Church of St. Stephen of Hungary - New York City
venue_aka => St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church
venue_name_with_markup_ip {html} =>
<h3 class="venue_name">St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church</h3> (Upper East Side)
venue_name_with_markup_vp {html} =>
<h2 class="venue">Church of St. Stephen of Hungary</h2>
venue_name_ip => St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church (Upper East Side)
venue_name_ip_clean => St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church
venue_name_vp => Church of St. Stephen of Hungary
venue_info_ip {html} =>
<span class="address">414 East 82nd Street</span> (since 1927)<br> <span class="address">420 East 14th Street</span> (1902-1927) &ndash; orig. Epis. Chapel of the Bread of Life; later Romeyn Chapel
venue_info_vp {html} =>
Church of St. Stephen of Hungary - New York City <td width="150"><img src="/Organs/NYC/img/StStephenHungaryExt.jpg" alt="St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church - New York City" width="150" border="0" > <strong>(Roman Catholic)</strong><br> 414 East 82nd Street<br> New York, N.Y. 10028<br> <td width="150"><img src="/Organs/NYC/img/RomeynChapelExt.jpg" alt="Romeyn Chapel (Presbyterian) - New York City (Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church Archives)" width="150" border="0" > St. Stephen of Hungary Church, the pride and joy of New York&#39;s Hungarian Roman Catholic community, began under very modest circumstances on the Lower East Side. The year was 1901. Upon the formation of the parish and the arrival of the Rev. Laszlo Perenyi from Eger, Hungary, the former Romeyn Presbyterian Chapel at 420 East 14th Street was purchased. Consecration of the altar occurred on November 6, 1904. As the congregation continued to expand with a sizeable number of them residing uptown, it was decided to erect a new combination of church, parochial school, community center, and adjoining rectory in Yorkville. <br> The architect chosen to draw up the plans for the new edifice was Emil J. Szendy. Construction began on St. Stephen&#39;s day, August 20, in 1927. As completed, Szendy&#39;s creation was built of light brick and sandstone with an archway at the center for the entrance to the church. To either side of the main entrance were entrances for the pupils of the school. The church, occupying the main story, seated 1,000 while the auditorium in the basement could accommodate 600. The school, situated on the upper floors, included 12 classrooms and two kindergarten rooms. <td width="250"><img src="/Organs/NYC/img/StStephenHungaryInt.jpg" alt="St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church - New York City" width="250" border="0" > Official consecration of the church on December 2, 1928, was presided over by Cardinal Hayes, followed by a lavish banquet at the Hotel Astor. A flyer announcing the event also contained a stern rebuke: <em>Nem igazi magyar katholikus az, aki err&#337;l az &uuml;nneps&eacute;gekr&#337;l ok n&eacute;lk&uuml;l t&aacute;volmarad!</em> (He who is absent from these ceremonies without reason is not a true Hungarian Catholic!) In response, some 10,000 of the faithful were present on the appointed day. The dignitaries included the Consul General of Hungary, representatives of the Hungarian government, with the dedication Mass celebrated by Msgr. Janos Csiszarik, emissary of the Cardinal Primate of Hungary. <br> After World War II the church became an important center for a wide variety of actions directed at the Soviet Union occupying Hungary and their Communist minions; a role that was reinforced in the aftermath of the 1956 uprising.
venue_addresses {html} =>
<span class="address">414 East 82nd Street</span> (since 1927)<br> <span class="address">420 East 14th Street</span> (1905-1927)<br>
venue_sources {html} =>
<td class="sources"><h2 class="sources">Sources</h2> Beszedits, Stephen. &quot;New York City&#39;s Hungarian Churches,&quot; Vasv&aacute;ry Collection Newsletter (Feb. 2005).<br> Dunlap, David W. <em>From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan&#39;s Houses of Worship.</em> New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.<br> St. Stephen of Hungary web site: <a href="http://www.saintstephenofhungary.org/" target="_blank">http://www.saintstephenofhungary.org</a><br> Webber, F.R. "Organ scrapbook" at Organ Historical Society Archives, Princeton, N.J. Specifications of Roosevelt organ, Op. 49 (1879). Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.<br> Illustrations Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church Archives: Romeyn Chapel exterior.<br> St. Stephen of Hungary website: interior.<br> Vasv&aacute;ry Collection Newsletter (Feb. 2005). Exterior.
venue_html_ip {html} =>
<td><h3 class="venue_name"><a href="/Organs/NYC/html/StStephenHungary.html">St. Stephen of Hungary Catholic Church</a></h3> (Upper East Side)</td> <td><span class="address">414 East 82nd Street</span> (since 1927)<br> <div class="organ with_specs">II/12 Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, Op. 4237 (1929); rev.</div> <span class="address">420 East 14th Street</span> (1902-1927) &ndash; orig. Epis. Chapel of the Bread of Life; later Romeyn Chapel<br> <div class="organ with_specs">I/2 Hilborne L. Roosevelt, No. 49 (1879)</div></td>
venue_html_vp {html} =>
[WIP]
num_organs_ip => 2
num_organs_vp => 4
organs_summary {html} =>
<a href="http://www.saintstephenofhungary.org/" target="_blank">http://www.saintstephenofhungary.org</a><br><br><br><table class="organs_summary"> <h2 class="organs_summary">Organ Specifications:</h2> <span class="address">414 East 82nd Street</span> (since 1927)<br> <a href="#Kilgen">II/12 Geo. Kilgen &amp; Son, Op. 4237</a> (1929); rev. <span class="address">420 East 14th Street</span> (1905-1927)<br> <a href="#Roosevelt">I/2 Hilborne L. Roosevelt, Op. 49</a> (1879)
organs_html_ip {html} =>
II/12 Geo. Kilgen & Son, Op. 4237 (1929); rev.
I/2 Hilborne L. Roosevelt, No. 49 (1879)
organs_html_vp {html} =>

ORGAN 2/0 [Roosevelt]

---------- I/2 Hilborne L. Roosevelt, Op. 49 (1879)----------

Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed [Organ div no. 1]

8 Open Diapason [unit] 85 2 Clarabella [ext.]
8 Clarabella [unit] 85
1 1/3
Larigot +
4
Octave
Mixture III ranks *
183
4
Clarabella
8
Clarinet
61
2 2/3
Clarabella
Tremolo
2
Super Octave *
+ top octave from SW Gedeckt
---

Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed [Organ div no. 2]

8 Gedeckt [unit] 85
2 2/3
Twelfth
8 Salicional 73 2 Fifteenth * GT
8 Vox Celeste 73 Mixture III ranks * GT
4
Principal
GT
8
Trompette *
85
4
Flute
4
Clarion *
---

Pedal Organ – 32 notes [Organ div no. 3]

16 Bourdon [unenclosed] 44 8 Flute [ext.]
16
Echo Bourdon [ext. SW Ged.]
12
4
Choral Bass [ext.]
8
Octave [orig. 1st O. Diap.]
44
* added by Schantz Organ Company
---

Couplers [Organ div no. 4]

Great to Pedal 8', 4' Great 16', 4', Unison Off
Swell to Pedal 8', 4' Swell 16', 4', Unison Off
Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'
---

Expression [Organ div no. 5]

Balanced Great Pedal
Balanced Swell Pedal
Crescendo Pedal
---

ORGAN 3/1 -- Geo. Kilgen & Son [Kilgen]

----------

Geo. Kilgen & Son

St. Louis, Mo. – Opus 4237 (1929)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 25 stops, 12 ranks
The 1929 Kilgen organ is enclosed in two expression chambers in the gallery of the church. New pipework was added by the Schantz Organ Company of Orrville, OH, including the Trompette and Mixture ranks, and extensions of the upper octaves. Schantz also made the original First Open Diapason playable in the Pedal. In 1995, Austin Organs, Inc. installed a new two-manual console on the existing movable platform. ----------

Manual – 58 notes [Organ div no. 1]

8
Open Diapason
58
16
Bourdon bass [C1-B13]
13
---

ORGAN 4/2 -- Hilborne L. Roosevelt [Roosevelt]

---------- Organ in former church located at 420 East 14th Street:

Hilborne L. Roosevelt

New York City – Opus 49 (1897)
Mechanical action
1 manual, 2 stops This small organ was built in 1897 by Hilborne L. Roosevelt for the Romeyn Chapel of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church. It is possible that this organ remained with the building when it was sold in 1905 to St. Stephen of Hungary Church. The following specification was recorded by F.R. Webber in one of his "Organ Scrapbooks," now in the collection of The Organ Historical Society Archives in Princeton, N.J. ----------
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date_modified => 2022-03-11 16:32:03
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