Manhattan — Harry F. Sinclair Residence — Upper East Side

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venue_name => Harry F. Sinclair Residence
borough => manhattan
neighborhood => Upper East Side
venue_status => Non-Extant or Moved
vp_title => Harry F. Sinclair Residence - New York City
venue_name_with_markup_ip {html} =>
<h3 class="venue_name">Harry F. Sinclair Residence</h3> (Upper East Side)
venue_name_with_markup_vp {html} =>
<h2 class="venue">Harry F. Sinclair Residence </h2><strong><br>
venue_name_ip => Harry F. Sinclair Residence (Upper East Side)
venue_name_ip_clean => Harry F. Sinclair Residence
venue_name_vp => Harry F. Sinclair Residence
venue_info_ip => 2 East 79th Street at Fifth Avenue – now Ukrainian Institute of America
venue_info_vp {html} =>
Harry F. Sinclair Residence - New York City <a href="/Organs/NYC/img/ResSinclairHFExt2.jpg"><img src="/Organs/NYC/img/ResSinclairHFExt2.jpg" alt="Harry F. Sinclair Mansion - New York City" width="250" border="0"></a> </strong> 2 East 79th Street at Fifth Avenue <br> New York, N.Y. 10021<br> <td width="150"><a href="/Organs/NYC/img/SinclairHF.jpg"><img src="/Organs/NYC/img/SinclairHF_tmb.jpg" alt="Harry Ford Sinclair (credit: Library of Congress)" width="150" border="0"></a> Harry Ford Sinclair (1876-1956) was an American oil industrialist. Born in Benwood, West Virginia, Sinclair grew up in Independence, Kansas. The son of a pharmacist, he entered the pharmacy department of the University of Kansas at Lawrence. He was working as a pharmacist in 1901 when an opportunity came about in the rapidly expanding oil industry that saw him become a lease broker and acquire an interest in the White Oil Company. In 1904, Sinclair married Elizabeth Farrell of Independence, Kansas. By 1916, Harry Sinclair was highly successful and established the Sinclair Oil Company from the assets of eleven small petroleum companies. Sinclair helped organize the State Bank of Commerce, which later was acquired by the First National Bank of Independence, of which Sinclair served on the board of directors. Harry Sinclair&#39;s high-profile image as a reputable American business leader and sportsman came under question in April of 1922 when the <em>Wall Street Journal</em> reported that United States Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall had granted an oil lease to Sinclair Oil without competitive bidding. The oil field lease was for government land in Wyoming that had been created as an emergency reserve for the United States Navy. What became known as the Teapot Dome scandal, ultimately led to a United States Senate establishing a Committee on Public Lands and Surveys to conduct hearings into the circumstances surrounding the government oil lease. The result was a finding of fraud and corruption which led to a number of civil lawsuits and criminal charges against Harry Sinclair and others. In 1927 the United States Supreme Court declared the Sinclair oil lease had been corruptly obtained and ordered it canceled. Two weeks after Harry Sinclair&#39;s trial began in October of 1927, it abruptly ended when the judge declared a mistrial following evidence presented by the government prosecutors showing that Sinclair had hired a detective agency to shadow each member of the jury. Sinclair was charged with contempt of court, the case eventually winding up before the United States Supreme Court who, on June 3, 1929, upheld Sinclair&#39;s conviction. He was fined and sentenced to six months in prison. In 1929, Secretary Albert B. Fall was found guilty of bribery, fined $100,000 and sentenced to one year in prison - making him the first Presidential cabinet member to go to prison for his actions in office. After serving his short prison term, Sinclair returned to his successful business. He had owned a luxurious French Renaissance-style ch&acirc;teau, designed by Cass Gilbert, on the southeast corner of Fifth Avenue and 79th Street. His reputation destroyed, Sinclair sold the property in 1930. Located in the same area as several major museums, it was eventually acquired by the Ukrainian Institute of America and is now open to the public. Harry Ford Sinclair died a wealthy man in Pasadena, California in 1956 and was interred in the Roman Catholic Calvary Cemetery, East Los Angeles.<br> The Sinclair mansion was built by Isaac D. Fletcher on land that he bought from Henry H. Cook, who owned the entire block. In selling the property, Mr. Cook restricted every lot on the block for the use of private homes in perpetuity.
venue_sources {html} =>
<span class="sources"><h2 class="sources">Sources</h2> Carnahan, John. Factory Shop Order for Estey Organ, Op. 2053 (1922).<br> The Estey Pipe Organ web site: <a href="http://www.esteyorgan.com" target="_blank">www.esteyorgan.com</a><br> &quot;5th Av. Home Sold by Harry F. Sinclair,&quot; <em>The New York Times</em> (Jan. 10, 1930).<br> &quot;Mrs. Harry F. Sinclair, 85, a Former Concert Pianist,&quot; <em>The New York Times</em> (May 16, 1964).<br><br> Illustrations Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division: portrait </span>
venue_html_ip {html} =>
<td><h3 class="venue_name">Harry F. Sinclair Residence</h3> (Upper East Side)</td> <td>2 East 79th Street at Fifth Avenue &ndash; now Ukrainian Institute of America<br> <div class="organ">III/27 Estey Organ Company, Op. 2053 (1922)</div></td>
venue_html_vp {html} =>
[WIP]
num_organs_ip => 1
num_organs_vp => 1
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III/27 Estey Organ Company, Op. 2053 (1922)
organs_html_vp {html} =>

Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes [Organ div no. 1]


Expression Chamber #1 Expression Chamber #2
8
Open Diapason
61
8
Keraulophone
61
8
Major Flute
61
8
Gamba
61
8
Doppel Flute
61
8
Viol d'Orchestre
61
8
Melodia
61
8
Viol Celeste [TC]
49
8
Clarabella
61
8
Gemshorn
61
8
Unda Maris [TC]
49
8
Gemshorn Celeste [TC]
49
4
Flute Harmonic
61
8
Saxophone
61
8
Cornopean
61
Flute Mixture III ranks
183
Tremolo [Chambers 1 & 2]
Harp
49 notes
---

Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed (duplexed from Great) [Organ div no. 2]


8
Open Diapason
8
Keraulophone
8
Major Flute
8
Gamba
8
Doppel Flute
8
Viol d'Orchestre
8
Melodia
8
Viol Celeste [TC]
8
Clarabella
8
Gemshorn
8
Unda Maris [TC]
8
Gemshorn Celeste [TC]
4
Flute Harmonic
8
Saxophone
8
Cornopean
Flute Mixture III ranks
Harp
---

Echo Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed (Expression Chamber #3) [Organ div no. 3]


8
Horn Diapason
61
8
Orchestral Oboe
61
4
Flauto Traverso
61
8
Vox Humana
61
8
Echo Salicional
61
Tremolo
8
Voix Celeste [TC]
49
Chimes
20 notes
---

Echo Automatic Accompaniment [Organ div no. 4]


All speaking stops duplexed from above.
---

Pedal Organ – 30 notes [Organ div no. 5]


16
Open Diapason
30
16
Bass Viol [unit]
42
16
Bourdon
30
8
'Cello
---

Couplers [Organ div no. 6]


Great to Pedal Swell to Echo
Swell to Pedal Swell to Swell 16', 4'
Echo to Pedal Great Unison Separation
Swell to Great 16', 8', 4' Swell Unison Separation
Echo to Great 16', 8', 4' Echo Unison Separation
---

Combination Pistons [Organ div no. 7]


Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5-6 affecting Great & Pedal Stops
Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5-6 affecting Swell & Pedal Stops
Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 affecting Echo & Pedal Stops
---

Pedal Movements [Organ div no. 8]


Chamber #1 Expression Pedal Crescendo Pedal
Chamber #2 Expression Pedal Great to Pedal Reversible
Chamber #3 Expression Pedal
---

ORGAN 1/1 -- Estey Organ Company

----------

Estey Organ Company


Brattleboro, Vt. – Opus 2053 (1922)
Electro-pneumatic action
Automatic Roll Player
3 manuals, 42 stops, 27 ranks


The Estey Shop Order dated October 20, 1922, indicates that the organ was voiced on 6" wind pressure provided by a 5 H.P. Orgoblo. An Estey Automatic Roll player was contained in the three-manual console that had celluloid stop-keys. ----------
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date_modified => 2022-03-11 16:32:03
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